Tips on Close Up Flower Photography – Point and Shoot Cameras

Flowers are some of the most easiest and trickiest subjects for the photographer. There is not one angle left that a flower hasn’t been photographed from. However,close up flower photography is a subject that still interests the many people who hold a camera, whether it be a professional or an amateur.

Ever since I had a camera, I’ve tried to photograph flowers from up close. However getting that particular look that I want has been very tricky. So I searched for various tips on how to photograph a flower from up close. Here are the tips I found to be handy. Mind you, these are somethings I found over in various forums and websites.

Close up flower photograph from below the flower
I’ve tried to frame the flower between two coconut trees here.

Tips for Close Up Flower Photography with point and shoot cameras:

  • It always helps to have an assistant with you to give shade.
  • You won’t be able to use the optical (eye level) viewfinder and will have to use the LCD to compose and focus.
  • Shade the LCD from direct sunlight. A hood that attaches to your camera with Velcro can be bought commercially or you can create one yourself.
  • Check your manual to see if you can brighten the LCD for shooting in sunlight.
  • Remember that your camera focuses on what is exactly in the center of your viewfinder.
  • Put the area that you want to be sharpest in the center of your viewfinder and use “Focus Lock”.
  • Recompose and take your picture.
  • Tripods will be useful but not essential.
  • Try for side lighting.
  • Don’t use flash as it won’t cover the picture area evenly and will grossly overexpose the image.
  • Set your ISO on “Auto”.
  • Set your camera on the “Green” setting or on the “P” setting.
  • Read the instruction manual to see how close you can focus in normal mode and the range you can use in “Macro Mode”.
  • Learn how to set your camera on “Macro Mode”.
  • If your camera has it, learn how to use “Manual Focus”. While “Auto Focus” works you don’t always know exactly where the focus point is.
  • TAKE LOTS OF SHOTS!

Vishaal Bhat

Founder manipalblog| Student| Father| Blogger| Pharmacology Teacher| Chess & Photography Enthusiast| Voracious Reader| Hindu Nationalist.